Girlfriends Read

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For all of her nine years, fragile Elizabeth Ann has heard her Aunt Frances refer in whispers to "those horrible Putney cousins."  But when her aunt can no longer care for her, Elizabeth Ann is forced to leave her sheltered life in town, to live in the wilds of Vermont with distant relatives.

In the beginning, Elizabeth Ann is shocked by country living---pets are allowed to sleep in the house and children are expected to do chores!  But with country living comes independence and responsibility, and in time Elizabeth Ann finds herself making friends and enjoying the company of her newfound family.  When, after a year, Aunt Frances comes to get her niece, she discovers a healthier, prouder girl with a new name---Betsy---and a new outlook on life.

Read this delightful book and join the discussion on Thursday, January 9, 2014 at 6:30 in the evening.  Snacks will be served.

Posted by: Jahnke
on December 16, 2013
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Who would leave a world-famous pie recipe to a cat?

When Alice's Aunt Polly, The Pie Queen of Ipswitch, passes away, she takes with her the secret to her world-famous piecrust recipe.  Or does she?  In her will, Polly leaves the recipe to her extraordinarily fat, remarkably disagreeable cat, Lardo...and then leaves Lardo in the care of Alice.

Suddenly, the whole town is wondering how you leave a recipe to a cat.  Everyone wants to be the next big pie-contest winner, and it's making them pie-crazy.  It is up to Alice and her friend Charlie to put the pieces together and discover the not-so-secret recipe for happiness: Friendship.  Family.  And the pleasure of doing something for the right reason.

Join us on Thursday, December 12th at 6:30 in the evening to discuss this entertaining novel and enjoy some pie.

Register at the youth desk and pick up a copy of the book.  Or call the youth desk at 886-6335, or email us at youthdesk@neenahlibrary.org.

Posted by: Jahnke
on November 23, 2013
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"Ida B," Mama said to me on one of those days that start right and just keep heading toward perfect until you go to sleep," when you're done with the dishes, you can go play.  Daddy and I are going to be working until dinner."

"Yes, ma'am," I said back, but I said it like this,"Yes, MAY-uhm!" because I couldn't wait to get on with my business.  I could already hear the brook calling to me through the back door screen.  "C'mon out and play, Ida B.  Hurry up, hurry up, hurry up."  I had three places I wanted to visit, six things I wanted to make, and two conversations I hoped to have before dinnertime.

Mama was washing, Daddy was drying, and I was putting away the dishes from lunch.  And I knew the moment I set the last pan in its place, I was free.  But the way those two were chatting and laughing and acting like we had till next week to finish up, I could see it was going to be a while.

My insides started itching and my feet started hopping, one then the other, because they were ten minutes past being ready to go.  So I decided to speed things up a bit.

Daddy'd hand me a dish, I'd sprint to the cupboard and put it away, race back again, and put my hand out for the next one, with my right foot tap, tap, tapping the seconds that were ticking by.

"Hold your horses, Ida B," Daddy told me.  "There's plenty of time to do whatever you're planning."  And he passed me a plate, slow and easy.

Well, that stopped me in my tracks.  Because what Daddy said might have seemed all right to him, but it was sitting about two miles beyond wrong with me.  I wasn't going to be able to put away another tiny teaspoon till I set things straight.

"Daddy," I said, and I waited till he was looking at me before I went on.

"Yes, Ida B," he answered, turning toward me.

And staring right into his eyeballs I told him, "There is never enought time for fun."  (Katherine Hannigan). 

Read this excellent book, and then join us for the discussion and some snacks on Thursday, November 21st at 6:30 until 7:30.

Copies of the book are available at the youth desk.  Stop in to register and pick up a book.

Posted by: Jahnke
on October 29, 2013
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Abilene Tucker arrives in Manifest, Kansas in 1936 at the height of The Great Depression.  Her mother has died, and her father, Gideon Tucker, grew up in Manifest.  When he gets a job in another part of the country, he sends Abilene to Manifest to stay with his old friend, Shady Howard. Abilene soon explores the town and gets to know the people of Manifest.  She also finds a box of treasures under the floor boards of her bedroom.  Abilene sets out to find out who they belonged to.  Were they her father's from his childhood?  And if so, where and how did he get them?  Abilene sets out to find the answers, and along the way, she finds out the story of her father's life in Manifest.  Abilene also tries to unravel the mystery of a treasure map and a spy known as "The Rattler."  Will she find the answers?

Join us on Thursday, October 24th at 6:30 in evening to discuss Abilene's adventures and enjoy some snacks.

Posted by: Jahnke
on October 01, 2013
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JOIN US AT THE NEENAH PUBLIC LIBRARY AT A NEW DATE AND TIME--

 WE WILL MEET ON THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26th FROM 6:30 UNTIL 7:30 IN THE EVENING TO DISCUSS RULES AND ENJOY SOME SNACKS.

Twelve-year-old Catherine just wants a normal life.  Which is nearly impossible when you have a brother with autism and a family that revolves around his disability.  She has spent years trying to teach David the rules from " a peach is not a funny-looking apple" to "keep your pants on in public"--- in order to head off David's embarrassing behaviors.

But the summer Catherine meets Jason, a surprising, new sort-of-friend, and Kristi, the potential next-door friend she has always wished for; it's her own shocking behavior that turns everything upside down and forces her to ask: What is normal?

Filled with humor and warmth, Cynthia Lord's debut novel takes a candid and sensitive look at feeling different and finding acceptance--beyond the rules.

 

Posted by: Jahnke
on September 10, 2013

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